Civil War McClellan Pommel Shields

Civil War McClellan Pommel Shields

Like so many details of American military horse equipment, these details can be traced to European influences – even to the small small brass decorative fittings.  Pommel ornaments or ‘shields’ are a fixture of US military saddles going all the way back to the first Ringgold dragoons saddles (circa 1841-42).   A natural solution for reinforcing…

McClellan Pattern of 1859 saddle rings and staples

One of the distinctive characteristics of a civil war McClellan saddle are the four saddle rings, ‘holdin down the corners’.  On reading the Ordnance Manual of 1861 and it’s description for how these were to be installed, it was a little bit confusing.  The rings were to be installed with iron staples driven through the…

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US Pattern of 1859 iron buckles for cavalry equipment

In 1859, the McClellan model cavalry saddle specifications were extensively revised from the previously tested Pattern of 1857 McClellan (commonly referred to as the Trial Saddle). One of these alterations was the substitution of the hardware used for the bridle, saddlebags, carbine loop and coat straps with that made of ‘blued malleable iron’. Many collectors…

WW1 saddle ovals –  variations

WW1 saddle ovals – variations

Anyone that has worked with a number of surplus war contract M1904 McClellans will likely have run across this variation in the brass mortice plates, also known by the manufacturers name as ‘saddle ovals’.  In general, nearly all McClellans used the smaller, slightly elongated form.  Occasionally, you’ll find a mortice plate that is rounder shape,…